Junior/Senior Student Council Visits Rotary

On Monday, the junior and senior officers of Hillcrest’s Student Council spoke to members of the South Hinds County Rotary club, of which our Head of School, Dr. Buchanan, is a member. After enjoying lunch, each student spoke about her experiences at Hillcrest, how she has grown as a result of attending HCS, and her plans for the future. It was an excellent opportunity for leaders of our school to reach out to service-minded members of our community.

Back Row, L to R: Club President Don Davis, Sarah Grace Brownlee, Mrs. Massey, Aaliyah Newsome, Abigail Browning, Leah Wells, Dr. Buchanan; Front Row: Kaylyn Turner, Trinity Powell

Rotary is “a global network of 1.2 million neighbors, friends, leaders, and problem-solvers who see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change – across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves…. From literacy and peace to water and health, we are always working to better our world, and we stay committed to the end.”

Seniors Step-up, Share History

A group of senior students recently asked permission to create a bulletin board in the high school hall to draw students’ attention to the importance of Black History Month. They spent a few hours one afternoon putting it together, and it features both well- and not-so-well-known African-Americans who have made significant contributions to culture, science, human rights, and every other aspect of our nation’s history.

These history-minded student-leaders plan to change pictures and short bios regularly, in order to feature a wide variety of influential black Americans during the entire month of February. Perhaps one day, future Hillcrest students will shine a spotlight on them!

Eagle Scouts Excel as Leaders

Hillcrest Christian School is proud to claim these 3 young men as our own.  Stephen Dooley and JoJo Moss recently achieved the rank of Eagle Scout within the Boy Scouts of America, and Preston Vaughan is in the process of being awarded this honor.  (Read about his Eagle Scout project in the article, “Nursing students lend artistic hand to scout’s project.”)  And while many of us realize that this is an impressive achievement, we don’t completely understand why.

A young man does not become an Eagle Scout within a few months; it takes years, and only about 5 percent of Boy Scouts complete the work to earn this highest level in Scouting. According to the National Eagle Scout Association, candidates must first advance through the ranks—Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, and Life, by passing specific tests which are organized by requirements and merit badges, demonstrating proficiency in the areas of leadership, service, and outdoor skills.  Of the more-than-130 merit badges available, 21 must be earned to qualify for Eagle Scout, 13 of which are required in areas including First Aid, Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the Nation, Citizenship in the World, Communications, Cooking, Environmental Science, Personal Fitness, Personal Management, Camping, and Family Life. In addition, a Scout has a choice between Emergency Preparedness and Lifesaving and a choice among Cycling, Hiking, and Swimming.

Furthermore, at each of his rank advancements, a Scout must conference with his Scoutmaster in order to set goals in line with his talents and abilities and in order that the Scoutmaster may evaluate how well he accomplished his present goal.  Also, at each level after First Class, the Scout must demonstrate leadership by holding positions of responsibility in his patrol and/or troop.  The skills learned in Scouting—citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness—benefit these young men for the rest of their lives, as they enter college and careers, and in understanding the importance of community service.

The Hillcrest family could not be more proud of these 3 juniors and of their achievements!

“Christmas is a tonic for our souls….”

B.C. Forbes further explains, “….It moves us to think of others rather than of ourselves. It directs our thoughts to giving.”  Today is unofficially recognized as the first official day of the Christmas Season. Stores are full of “perfect gifts” trimmed in red and green; ads for jewelry, perfumes, the latest technology, and toys flood the airwaves; and in malls across America, children can be found sitting with Santa and telling him what they hope to find when they wake up on Christmas morning. It’s impossible to miss the theme: Christmas is a time for giving.

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Many families have changed their traditions so that gift-giving is no longer the primary focus of this time of year, as some feel that the holiday meant to celebrate the birth of our Savior has become too commercialized; however, giving gifts can be a pure expression of our love for others.  In fact, God himself gave humankind the greatest gift of all: God in human form, the only perfect person ever to walk the earth, whose sole purpose was to die so that we might live.

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Gift giving can also “open doors” so that Christians might share this good news.  For children who don’t always have daily necessities, much less extras such as presents, receiving a gift shows that there are people in the world who love them, even if they’ve never met.  This often makes them more receptive to hearing about Jesus, another man they haven’t met face-to-face, but who loves them enough to have died for them.  To this end, Hillcrest’s Upper School students donated enough toys and candy to fill approximately 200 stockings, which will allow the staff and congregation of City Church to minister to local needy children.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” – John 3:16

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